Portfolio

This is a detailed account of our Financial Independence (FI) portfolio, meant to bridge the gap between the time we leave our full-time jobs and the time we can start drawing from our tax-advantaged retirement accounts (401k, IRAs, etc) without penalty (around the time we are 60 years old).

Our retirement accounts are not detailed here, but they represent a significant part of our overall net worth.

14 comments:

  1. Cool. Another blogger with a Google Docs portfolio. I'm surprised more people are not using it this way. I like the summary and detail tabs...that's a really good idea.

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    1. Thanks for the feedback. I was pleasantly surprised by their "=GoogleFinance" formulas. It's very straightforward to insert a number of constantly updating, nearly real-time data elements (like recent price or P/E). Somewhat selfishly, I do wish they provided even more info like Dividend per share or Dividend pay date. Given the ability to automatically calculate the market value for one or more holdings, it's possible to quickly check on real-time holding Weight, Current Yield, and gain/loss info.

      http://support.google.com/docs/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=155178

      S.B., I see that you've made nice use of it yourself when tracking your own portfolio on your site. I do wonder why you have certain rows with 0 current shares though -- is that serving as a sort of combined holdings summary and watch list?

      I'm still not satisfied with my own spreadsheet's ability to track separate lots of a single holding. Right now I have a method that works, but it's clunky and not scalable. I'll need to think this one over a bit more to come up with a more suitable method for tracking lots over the long term.

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    2. I love Google Docs! It's amazing what you can do with GoogleFinance, but I wish they hadn't discontinued GoogleLookup. I feel like I am just scratching the surface of what it can do. Yes, the zero lines on my blog portfolio serve as a watch list. I should put a note in to clarify. Best of luck with your portfolio...I'll be following it.

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    3. I've been making some revisions lately. If you feel like it, let me know what you think about the lot-tracking enhancements in the Detail tab.

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  2. Nice looking portfolio you have here. Lots of solid, blue chips and some high paying yielders to boost.

    Best of luck to you on your quest to financial independence!

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    1. Thanks! I see we share several holdings in common. I'll be following your progress in the future. Wishing you success in the future.

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  3. Ok. New follower here. Just found your "Death to the Mortgage" blog and it appears you share the same financial philosophy that I do. Paid of my 30yr mortgage (though smaller than yours) in 19 months. Been kind of drifting for the last year, but am re-grouping now that I have about $3,400.00 per month that I can invest. I am self-employed and work less than 10 hours a week on average. I believe strongly in DGI and will begin to construct a DGI portfolio in a month or so. Need to pay off about $2,000.00 in accumulated debt first. I have rental real estate that I've accumulated as well. More on that later. Congratulations on your outstanding accomplishments! I look forware to contributing and sharing here.

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    1. Thanks! 30 years in 19 months is impressive. Do you have a blog or profile of your own or will you continue to be anonymous?

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  4. I wonder if you have considered buying ETFs or mutual funds which focus on dividends, rather than individual securities?

    Is there a place on your blog where you talk about your methodology for choosing securities? If not, is there a known strategy you follow?

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    1. Yes, I have considered it. I'm most interested in using ETFs and funds to simplify investments in securities which would otherwise add complexity to my life in some way -- especially those which complicate tax filing. For that reason I have my eye on ETFs for investing in MLPs, non-US stocks which would otherwise be subject to foreign tax withholding, and less-liquid sectors where I don't want to hold too many individual securities (for diversification). At the time of this comment I'm invested in an ETF that corresponds to an index of US preferred stocks. However in our retirement accounts we are invested almost 100% in mutual funds, so I have no objection to using them.

      I haven't talked about my methodology anywhere, mainly because I don't have a strict methodology at the moment. I do a lot of reading of financial websites and PF blogs and follow companies for a while before committing cash to them. I tend to lean towards higher-yielding value companies or dividend-paying growth companies which I expect to commit to growing their dividends in the future (SBUX, QCOM) with a few blue chips, utilities, and REITs mixed in to help with steady cash flow.

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  5. Hi, I was wondering does your portfolio change now that the economy is becoming more uncertain?

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    1. It hasn't changed much due to the economy, no. We have slowed our rate of new purchases recently because of higher relative stock valuations, but we haven't sold due the overall economy.

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  6. What a great blog. I find myself in a similar situation work wise. Upon driving today I had another thought about my investment philosophy. I too was trying to provide an income stream of dividends or passive income enough to support FI. However I realized that non-income producing investments are also wise, as the income is not taxed now and can build until I do need it. BRK-B for example, they reinvest the dividends versus paying them. That keeps my taxes low for now while I'm working, and I can pay later when I need the $$. I still have many income producers as well, like utilities etc.

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  7. Impressive numbers! Is there any particular reason why you invested mainly in real estate?
    Wishing all the best in your investment yourney
    EternalYield

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